4 YouTube Channels that Prepare Food for Their Pets

We all want the best for our pets. One way to doing so would be to ensuring your dog(s) and cat(s) receive a well-balanced, nourishing and nutritious diet. While some pet owners believe in buying premium dry dog food, others opt for piling their bowls with scraps of meal leftovers, some pet owners have also taken it upon themselves to construct their fur friend’s meals from scratch. If you are also thinking of pampering your pet to this degree, but is in dire need of inspiration, then this compilation is definitely for you!

JUNSKITCHEN

 

Enter Jun Yoshizuki, or better known by his YouTube handle, Junskitchen, whose channel ranges from the likes of cooking scrumptious Japanese fare, to co-collaborating with his fiancé on slice-of-life vlogs. However, there is a constant — the omnipresence of Yoshizuki’s three cats lounging atop the fridge in the background.

The channel’s most well-received video features Yoshizuki dishing up a protein-based nigiri sushi, in which the staple vinegar rice is substituted with steamed minced chicken. “I used chicken instead of rice,” he later explains, as “they (his cats) liked chicken better”. After all, cats are obligate carnivores, and are more inclined towards consuming meat. Yoshizuki even artfully brushes his concoction with a homemade bonito broth, which he extracts with a coffee siphon. The end result is nothing short of a Michelin-starred delicatessen for his felines, who scarf down the meal in mere seconds. The nondescript bowl of canned tuna placed by Yoshizuki’s dish for comparison, hardly gets a second glance.

 

JIRO YAMADA

 

Another YouTuber of Japanese descent, Jiro Yamada, (whose youtube channel bears the same name), chronicles his life whipping up meals he often shares with his Shiba Inu, Kuro. The charm of Yamada’s videos stem from the modest Japanese fare he prepares in his cozy kitchen, and the satisfaction of having a filled plate placed before the dog. Kuro, however — is like most of us. On some days, he gobbles down dishes of sliced raw tuna and horse Salisbury steak. On other days, where leafy greens are on the menu, we find Yamada’s beloved dog turning his nose up at diced bitter gourd.

 

GONE TO THE SNOW DOGS

 

Meet the huskies behind Gone to The Snow Dogs: Memphis, Oakley and Shelby, who all seem far more enthusiastic about raw carrots than Kuro ever will be. One half of husband-and-wife duo, Jessica Hatch runs her share of the Snow Dogs Snacks series preparing homemade recipes which are both human and dog-friendly.

Like most pet owners mentioned on this list, Hatch can’t help but to occasionally offer vegetable scraps to her huskies, which they scarf down with delight. However when it comes to preparing chicken soup, Hatch brings up an important point — whilst chicken bouillon is okayed for canine consumption, it should contain neither garlic nor onion in the ingredients list. Allium, a compound found in household garnishes such as chives, garlic, leeks, onions and scallions— are toxic to our canines and can make them very, very sick. Hatch also advises that wholesome, cooked treats for our beloved dogs can also be made to last, by mixing in a portion of chicken soup with dog treats, and freezing the rest for the week.

 

CAT LADY FITNESS

 

Jasmin Bedria, or better known as Cat Lady Fitness on YouTube, is our go-to guru for meeting the nutritional requirements of our feline friends.

In her raw cat food tutorial, we are taken through a supermarket where we watch her pick out assorted chicken gizzards— heart, livers, meat with the skin. Bedria advises the perks associated with preparing your cat’s food from scratch: compared to purchasing raw cat food found in pet specialty stores, home-prepped meals are simply “probably five to six times” cheaper.

Aside from her rigorous hand-washing ritual, we are also introduced to the slew of vitamins and supplements ranging from the likes of Vitamin E powder to salmon oil capsules which she adds to the concoction. “This (the vitamins) actually isn’t a necessity like the other things are,” Bedia elaborates, citing her concern about a potential medical condition her cat has. We later learn that weepy eyes are one of the many symptoms of feline herpes (a.k.a feline viral rhinopnuemonitis), which is bound to have affected at least 90% of the cat population.

Protip: Incorporating L-Lysine in your diet could possibly help alleviate the symptoms of cold sores and shingles.

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