The Adorable Truth behind Why Dogs Sleep a lot during the day

Dogs may be our best friends, but sometimes, we have a hard time figuring out why they do what they do. One of those things is certainly daily naps. No offense Doggo, but sleeping that much cannot be good. Well, for dogs, it doesn’t matter.

In fact, there are more than a few interesting things concerning our dogs and their sleeping patterns.  So, what are those, and what’s their importance? Given the questions never seem to end, we decided to indulge in an extensive research, and get to the bottom of it. So, here is all you need to know concerning your adorable pet and their sleep behavior.

Why Do Dogs Sleep So Much?

The answer to this question lies in the fact that dogs spend around 70% of their day lying around. Sometimes, it’s simply resting, and sometimes it’s napping, but one thing is for sure, they don’t move around as much. While it is connected with the dog breed, it has more to do with the level of activity your dog is adjusted to.

So, excluding other factors, depending on the training as a puppy, your dog will sleep more or less, and there’s pretty much nothing to do about it.

However, prolonged sleep also comes as they age. Like humans, when they reach a certain age, they get tired easily. Any sort of game or outside activity will be followed by the long naps afterward. While puppies have a different reason for sleep, older dogs simply need it just as much as they need food.

The Importance of Puppy Naps

Puppies discover the world as they grow, and this requires a high amount of energy, which is why their sleep is essential for successful training. They can sleep up to 20 hours, but this phase only lasts for a few months. Once they’re completely up on their feet, trained and ready to conquer, they adjust to the patterns established by factors such as breed and activity level. Still, what is it so essential when it comes to their long naps?

Well, take into account that puppies are also adjusting to the new surroundings, and whether it’s seeing new faces or battling other puppies during the day, the only solution is to sleep it through. The connection between their mood and the amount of sleep they get surprised the veterinarians as well, given that the studies shown dogs battle mental barriers with sleep as well, and this is especially present with puppies.

Sleeping Behaviors

Much like humans, dogs develop their own sleeping behaviors, and it rarely fits the pattern. Yet, the owners must look out for the changes such as loud snoring, given this indicates health issues. If your dog has a trouble breathing when sleeping, or if you cannot recognize the REM phase has started, check it with the vet to make sure all is fine.

The difference between us and dogs is that they’re much more flexible when it comes to switching states. We need time to adjust to the change, even if it’s just a few minutes. Dogs don’t. They automatically adjust to being awake and alert.

The main reason behind this is the fact they’re much more in control when it comes to sleep than we are. Their protective instinct and the fact they often sleep even though they have no need for it, create this reserve of energy, saved up for the critical situations. Even though this is more common with working dogs, our dogs at home have a similar regime.

Why Do Dogs Like to Sleep between our Legs?

The bond between owner and the dog is a strong one, but can easily be measured by the level of comfort present in dogs. One of the ways to tell is if your dog sleeps between your legs more often for it to be a coincidence. Being near you gives them a sense of pride, which is why they step up their comfort game.

However, this is only applicable to smaller breeds which is precisely why the studies focus on affection. If by any case, your dog is a larger breed and still does it, It may be they’re just looking for you to give them attention.

Being able to press against you is dog’s assurance they’ve gained your trust, which for them is a major part of the relationship. The position also is considered to be an instinct of a kind, given smaller breeds have their own perception of bonding.

Co-Sleeping with Dogs

Trying to match the sleeping cycle with your dog’s sleeping cycle may not as hard, and doesn’t even require a training. The mere fact your dog is often sleeping out of the pure boredom gives you a head start. Cuddling before falling asleep is yet another way to get your dog to sleep at the same time you do.

Dogs take their sleeping spot very seriously, and if that spot is anywhere near you, or includes you, the bond you have is stronger than you think.

So, relax and let it come naturally. Don’t be afraid to let them adjust to your bed, but make sure they know they have the spot of their own as well.  Sometimes, all they need is a pillow next to your bed for them to consider themselves a success.

How Long Can You Leave a Dog Alone?

The question that bothers many, and the question which demands several answers. How long can they stay alone in the house? Well, this comes down to the breed, and the chances your dog doesn’t qualify for living alone.

Why? Well, the maximum they should be left alone is 10 hours, but leaving them alone for this long risks the depression, as well as anxiety.

Dogs need affection before anything, and sometimes toys just won’t do it. Getting a dog sitter to check up on them every now and then is one of the ways to ensure they go along with it, but if you can avoid it, better do so, for you can never know when anxiety can choose to strike.

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